This summer season (November-February) alone, there have been four (4) reported driveway deaths in New Zealand—and unless parents and caregivers of at risk children heed safety messages— more will follow.

“Five (5) children are killed each year on average after being run over by a vehicle driving on a private driveway in New Zealand, and every two weeks a child is hospitalised after suffering serious injuries in the same way. Children at risk are aged between 1 and 3 years old. Sadly parents and close relatives are most often at the wheel,” said Ann Weaver, Director of Safekids Aotearoa.

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NO helmet, no bike! This is the safety message Safekids New Zealand wants schools, parents and caregivers to tell their bicycle-riding children as they return to
school this month. 

“Cycling is a healthy activity and is the first mode of transport for many Kiwi children,” said Ann Weaver, Director of Safekids New Zealand. “However, schools and parents must take action by ensuring safety comes first when their children hop on their bikes,” Ms Weaver said.

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Summer is an exciting time for Kiwi families. With the cold winter months a fading memory, parents are eager to get the kids out of the house. Summer however is also known as the “Trauma Season” due to the sharp rise in hospital admissions for unintentional injuries or accidents. The season brings with it a number of injury risks, and they include Quad Bike/ATV injuries and Driveway Run Overs. 

National figures gathered by Starship Children’s Health shows that 2 children are killed on average and a further 29 others are hospitalised due to quad bike related injuries each year. In 53% of the cases, children were identified as the drivers of an adult-sized quad bike (over 90cc).

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Safekids New Zealand and Consumer Affairs (now part of the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment) are giving life-saving information to parents and caregivers about the potential dangers of swallowing coin lithium batteries. 

Coin lithium batteries, commonly found in singing greeting cards, talking books, key remotes, some TV remotes and other small electronic devices, can lodge in the throats of babies and young children. Once lodged, saliva triggers an electrical current that causes a chemical reaction that can severely burn the oesophagus in as little as two hours. 

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Spring and summer is an exciting time for Kiwi families. With the cold winter months a fading memory, parents are eager to get the kids out of the house to enjoy the warmer days—and do some cleaning indoors and out.

Spring and especially summer however is also known as the “Trauma Season” due to the sharp rise in hospital admissions due to unintentional injuries or accidents. The season brings with it a number of injury risks, and one of the most serious is Driveway Run Over injury. 

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Media Release | NO HELMET, NO BIKE

NO helmet, no bike. This is the safety message Safekids New Zealand wants parents and caregivers to tell their bicycle-riding children.

“Cycling is a healthy activity and is the first mode of transport for many Kiwi children,” said Dr. Nick Baker, Community Paediatrician and chair of the Child & Youth Mortality Review Committee.

“However, parents must take action 

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EVERY DAY in New Zealand, an average of 22 children are admitted to hospital because of unintentional injuries or accidents. For young children (birth to 4 years old), most of these injuries happen at home.

Media stories have reported on recent home injuries with serious and fatal consequences: fires caused by kids playing with matches and lighters; poisoning due to ingestion of adult medication; children swallowing button batteries; and kids crushed by heavy appliances. 

Does this make the home a dangerous place? And what can you do to prevent these injuries?

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Safekids New Zealand invites community groups and organisations across the country with an interest in child injury prevention, to attend its workshops focusing on
‘Child Cycling Injury Prevention’ and ‘Safety Out & About’. 

Cycling related injuries are one of the top three causes of all injury related hospitalisations for children in New Zealand. In the five year period 2005-2009, a total of 2,436 child cyclists aged 0-14 years were injured severely enough to be admitted to hospital, an average of 487 hospitalisations per year. In the five year period 2003-2007 a total of 12 children died as a result of cycling related injuries.

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